Archive for the ‘iPhones’ Category

“Technology transfer” means the transfer of new technology from the originator to a secondary user, especially from developed to less developed countries in an attempt to boost their economies.

But in this post, it means “all of the hoops I had to jump through to transfer my iPhone contents to a new iPhone.”

Some Background

My ex, her daughter, and I all have iPhones, for which I am paying. My stepdaughter is in a situation where she can no longer use hers, and so my ex returned it to me so that I can cancel the account and—we hope—no longer have to pay for it.

That was some 3 months ago.

This morning it dawned on me that (1) my 16 Gb phone is always running out of space, and (2) her 32 Gb phone has the amount of memory I should have gotten for myself, and (3) it would make sense for me to start using the iPhone with the greater memory.

And so began my journey through purgatory

Actually, it wasn’t that  bad. Just terribly time-consuming.

I had previously reset the phone, clearing all personal data and returning it to its factory-fresh state. When I put it on the charger to check the battery level, it automagically went into setup mode, the first step of which was updating the operating system to the latest iOS version. No problem—except that it took nearly an hour to complete.

Did I mention that I worked on Apple’s iPhone help desk on the day it was first released? We had had two weeks of intense training about how to handle calls, and how to distinguish calls that could be handled by Apple and calls that should be routed to AT&T—the only carrier originally. We also had no idea what the iPhone even looked like, secrecy was that strict.

Anyway, after 8 hours of handling calls, all of which were of the AT&T variety, only to have AT&T route them back to us, I went home, drank an Irish coffee, had a nervous breakdown—and never went back to the job.

So yeah, I know what frustration  is.

The Next Phase

After the iOS update, it was time to do the same with all of the apps on the new phone. The initial setup had copied over the icons for the apps on the old phone, but none of the applications themselves. That took another hour.

Finally, there was the matter of actually launching the apps and having to key in userids and passwords. That ate up another 30 minutes, because I had to look them all up on the other phone. I mean, who has memorized userids and passwords for all of their accounts?

And What’s My Takeaway From all This?

It’s quite simple: whenever you buy a new device, make sure it has enough memory. Think you need 32 Gb on your iPhone? Get 64. My new iPad was 128 Gb, and I’m already wishing I could have afforded more.

Here’s the rule of thumb when it comes to memory: however much you have is never enough.

Thanks for stopping by.

Robyn Jane

Especially since this week was when the days officially started getting longer. But when I said they’re getting brighter, I meant it in a figurative and not a literal sense. You DO know what “literal” means, yes? It’s one of those words that far too many people sprinkle their speech with, never realizing that they’re using it incorrectly. It also gets confused with “virtual,” which is the word they should use.

ANYWAY, after nearly 10 days without my iPhone, I was finally able to get a ride to the Verizon store, where I was informed that there was nothing they could do, and that I needed to take it to the Apple Store.

When I explained this to my driver (my landlord), he asked where the Apple Store was. “Eastview Mall,” I answered.

This will tell you what kind of a guy my landlord, Ed, is: Eastview Mall is about 15 miles from our house. Ed’s reaction? “Well, we might as well go there now.”

At the Apple Store, since I didn’t have an appointment, they told me there would be about a 10 minute wait—which turned out to be about 3 minutes. I explained my problem, and that I was unable to resolve it on my own, since none of the troubleshooting steps list on the Apple web site worked.

Dave (the technician) was able to resolve my problem in about 10 minutes. I was a Happy Camper!

Of course, once I got home, it took about 30 minutes to restore my files.

What I Learned

1. Always, always, always BACK UP YOUR PHONE! Of course, since I was already obeying Robyn’s First Rule of Computing it was no big deal. What’s that? Oh, right: Robyn’s First Rule of Computing states BE PARANOID AND COMPULSIVE when it comes to backing up your data.

2. When attempting to recover from iPhone problems, it’s always best to do so via iTunes on a Macintosh computer. I have a PC and iTunes, but that combination just didn’t work.

3. You can save yourself a lot of heartache and stress if you get it fixed immediately!

And thus endeth the lesson for today.