WordPress is great for blogging, but it has limited visibility

Let’s be honest: blogging—even on WordPress—is a labor of love. Many of us pour out our hearts and souls only to receive comments that far too often are actually adds for products. It’s a rare day when I receive helpful comments.

Not so on Medium

I’m doing more and more of my serious writing on Medium. Don’t know what it is? Here’s how Medium bills itself:

Ideas and perspectives you won’t find anywhere else.
Medium taps into the brains of the world’s most insightful writers, thinkers, and storytellers to bring you the smartest takes on topics that matter. So whatever your interest, you can always find fresh thinking and unique perspectives.

The stories—that’s what Medium calls whatever you publish there—that I’ve written have received positive responses and replies. This is truly a supportive community by, of, and for writers. It doesn’t matter if you’re a rank beginner or a seasoned pro: you’re welcome here.

It’s free to join

Basic membership is free, but there’s also a premium membership level for $5 a month. The basic membership allows you complete access to stories, but restricts the number of stories marked “members-only” each month.

In addition, paid membership allows you to join the Medium Partners program, which gives you a chance to earn money on your stories. Oh, I’m not getting rich, but at least my stories earn enough to pay my membership fees.

There are also major commercial publications on Medium, and I’ve known authors whose stories have been picked up by the New York Times, and who have been paid the proverbial Big Buck$ for them.

So give it a try

Maybe you’ll like it, maybe you won’t. But what self-respecting writer would ever turn down an opportunity to put her stories in front of a larger audience?

Everybody Talks About the Weather

Posted: 8 October, 2018 in Apps, Weather
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And somebody finally did something about it.

Well,okay. He didn’t exactly do something about it, but he did create a weather app that shows the current conditions for your location, along with commentary about it.

Which is exactly the app I need. I’m never in the best of moods to begin with, and this app reflects my attitude toward whatever kind of weather we’re having at the moment.

Even if the weather’s nice, you’ll get the same snarky report:

It’s called “What the Forecast,” and you can grab a free copy from the developer’s website.

 

It’s Been a Long Time…

Posted: 18 September, 2018 in Aging, Depression
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…Since I last wrote

But I’m catching up now, after spending 6 days in hospital. 3 nights in the Emergency Department because there were no open beds on any of the medical floors, and then 3 nights in my own room.

Now that I’m home I’m looking forward to getting some actual rest. Being woken up every 4 hours to have my vitals checked and blood drawn is not conducive to a restful, healing sleep.

Then again, here at home I sometimes need to get the cat off my blanket in the middle of the night so I don’t freeze.

Yes, it’s that time of year again. Two weeks ago we were sweltering in 90+ heat, and last night it was 53. And today is supposed to hit 88. Rochester has weird weather in the early autumn.

I guess I’m finally Officially Old. Every single member of my medical team was at least 20 years younger than me. And now I’m getting home visits from a nurse and a physical therapist.

Getting old: it ain’t for sissies!

Still, however uncomfortable it may be, it still beats the hell out of the alternative. I have a grandson I’m hoping to see marry and perhaps raise a family. I have two others I want to be around when they graduate high school. So I do the exercises and watch my diet and do whatever I need to do to “age with grace.”

Whatever the hell that means. Dylan Thomas was right: I am definitely not going gentle into that good night.

Thought for the day:

And that, dear reader, sums up my attitude toward old age…

…and other assorted assholes.

But Life Goes On

As it tends to do. And it reminds me of a little tune Mason Williams wrote and which the Smothers Brothers recorded many, many years ago:

Isn’t life beautiful?
Isn’t life gay?
Isn’t life the perfect thing
To pass the time away!

And so, dear reader, I also go on.

Medium is not Facebook

Posted: 27 August, 2018 in Medium, Reading
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(I’ve written before about Medium; you can find the posts here and here.)

But why do I treat it as if it were?

A funny thing happened on the way to my breakup with Facebook. No, I’m not talking about the fact that today, more than two weeks after I told them to delete my account, it’s still active.

I’m talking about the ways I’ve been noticing how Facebook influenced?—?and still does?—?almost every aspect of my life.

Facebook makes it easy to be superficial. Read a friend’s post and like it? Just hit the LIKE button and move on. Between Facebook and the nightly “news,” my attention span has been drastically reduced.

As has my critical thinking.

How I used to read Medium

It was rather like Facebook: scroll down the latest stories, click on an interesting headline, read the story and give it a few claps. Then move on.

But today I realized that isn’t fair to the author?—?or to myself. Reading stories this way is the Facebookization (if I may coin a word) of Medium.

So I’m trying a new way of reading stories in Medium. Oh, I’ll still click on headlines that interest me, or stories my authors I follow, but that’s where things change: I’ll read more slowly, interspersed with sips of tea or hits on my vaper (yes, I finally said “goodbye” to tobacco). And I won’t give it any claps, at least not on the first reading. Yes, I’ll still highlight passages that caught my attention, or that I think require greater comment.

Instead, I’ll add the story to my reading list and reread it later. Maybe that say day, maybe the next, but not until I’ve had time to think about what I’ve read.

Authors spend a lot of time and put a lot of thought into their stories; the very least I can do is give them as much time and thought as they did.

“Technology transfer” means the transfer of new technology from the originator to a secondary user, especially from developed to less developed countries in an attempt to boost their economies.

But in this post, it means “all of the hoops I had to jump through to transfer my iPhone contents to a new iPhone.”

Some Background

My ex, her daughter, and I all have iPhones, for which I am paying. My stepdaughter is in a situation where she can no longer use hers, and so my ex returned it to me so that I can cancel the account and—we hope—no longer have to pay for it.

That was some 3 months ago.

This morning it dawned on me that (1) my 16 Gb phone is always running out of space, and (2) her 32 Gb phone has the amount of memory I should have gotten for myself, and (3) it would make sense for me to start using the iPhone with the greater memory.

And so began my journey through purgatory

Actually, it wasn’t that  bad. Just terribly time-consuming.

I had previously reset the phone, clearing all personal data and returning it to its factory-fresh state. When I put it on the charger to check the battery level, it automagically went into setup mode, the first step of which was updating the operating system to the latest iOS version. No problem—except that it took nearly an hour to complete.

Did I mention that I worked on Apple’s iPhone help desk on the day it was first released? We had had two weeks of intense training about how to handle calls, and how to distinguish calls that could be handled by Apple and calls that should be routed to AT&T—the only carrier originally. We also had no idea what the iPhone even looked like, secrecy was that strict.

Anyway, after 8 hours of handling calls, all of which were of the AT&T variety, only to have AT&T route them back to us, I went home, drank an Irish coffee, had a nervous breakdown—and never went back to the job.

So yeah, I know what frustration  is.

The Next Phase

After the iOS update, it was time to do the same with all of the apps on the new phone. The initial setup had copied over the icons for the apps on the old phone, but none of the applications themselves. That took another hour.

Finally, there was the matter of actually launching the apps and having to key in userids and passwords. That ate up another 30 minutes, because I had to look them all up on the other phone. I mean, who has memorized userids and passwords for all of their accounts?

And What’s My Takeaway From all This?

It’s quite simple: whenever you buy a new device, make sure it has enough memory. Think you need 32 Gb on your iPhone? Get 64. My new iPad was 128 Gb, and I’m already wishing I could have afforded more.

Here’s the rule of thumb when it comes to memory: however much you have is never enough.

Thanks for stopping by.

Robyn Jane